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Frequently Asked Questions

Really interested in the Welsh 3,000 in July but am not very fit at all. Worth me considering? How fit do you need to be to do this and enjoy it? I have done Snowdon a bunch of times (last time, last May) but would be keen to know your thoughts. Rach
Get Outdoors
Hi Rachel, great to hear from you!

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Get Outdoors
Hi Rach, it is a tough one. If you can get up Snowdon then you can managed the ascents, but the first day is very long, so it’s more about having the stamina to keep going again after you’ve done Snowdon. It is an amazing challenge and I’d say there’s still time to train for it, but if you’re not feeling that fit it would take a lot of commitment. We have lots of opportunities to train coming up, including day trip to Snowdon and Scafell Pike. How do you feel about it? Thanks, Chris

Rachel Hargrave
Chris. I have done the three peaks before but that was a while ago. Long days don’t bother me. I’m used to them on Kilimanjaro and Elbrus but the last big altitude mountain I climber was 2 years ago. I think I can push myself back to a reasonable level of fitness but don’t want to hold folks up. How would you suggest I train for the even between now and then IF I was going to go for it?? X
Seen by Rachel Hargrave at Tuesday 16:12

Get Outdoors
Hi Rachel, that's brilliant you've done the 3 Peaks, so you already know exactly what the relentless slopes of mountain ascents can be like. Also great you're used to the stamina needed for long days. We're never worried about people holding anyone back. We will have 2 leaders with a group of 12 for a challenge of this difficulty, so there's always options if there's a wide spread in fitness. It's also a great route for finding alternatives and shortcuts if needed.
Sent by Chris Get Outdoors Tarratt
Get Outdoors
Getting hill fit is about raising your heart and breathing rate for extended periods; getting your lungs, heart and muscles ready for working hard the way they do going up hill. I find the quickest way to get in shape for mountains is a combination of running/jogging and long walks that are as hilly as possible. I try to run 3 miles or more 3 times a week and do a 10 mile plus walk once a week. Both of these are more effective when I build in hills and the steeper the better. You need to be getting out of breath to make any decent improvement. I know running's not for everyone, so getting out and walking briskly up hills is the next best thing. Ultimately there's no real replacement for hiking up a mountain or an extended steep incline whenever you get the opportunity. I've never found gyms very useful as generally the equipment is too muscle specific (e.g. weights) or low resistance (e.g. running machine) and once boredom of the same room sets in you lose the mental battle to make yourself go. Hope that helps? P.S. try a Park Run! The atmosphere is lovely, they're free, cater for any ability (including walking most or even all of it) and are not meant as a race. They can be seriously motivational!
Sent by Chris Get Outdoors Tarratt